Better Business Bureau flags 7 Atlantic Canada work-at-home Offers


The Better Business Bureau has identified seven companies, each making a similar offer for project co-ordinator, project manager or project administrator positions. The companies are reaching out to job seekers who have posted resumes online.

Some people across the country are getting offers for high-paying, work-at-home schemes from companies that claim to be based in Atlantic Canada.

The Better Business Bureau has identified seven companies, each making a similar offer for project co-ordinator, project manager or project administrator positions. Some of the work in the job description may involve co-ordinating student travel.

The companies that are reaching out to job seekers who have posted resumes online:

  • Aboriginal Exchange Program
  • Canadian Education Exchange Foundation (CEEF)
  • National Student Exchange Program/World Education Program
  • School Year and Summer Group Exchange
  • SEVECC Community Involvement Program
  • World Capital Alliance
  • Canadian Education Student Exchange Foundation

Peter Moorhouse, president and CEO of the Better Business Bureau in Atlantic Canada, calls it a classic “too good to be true” scenario.

“It is $45 an hour going up to $50 an hour after a two or three-week period,” he said.

“They are, in some cases, approaching students who have no work experience at all. And you know that’s a pretty generous salary for somebody with no particular experience.”

He says, in each case, the company is not actually located at the address it claims — and efforts to reach people at the company in person, on the telephone, or through email or regular mail all come up empty.

In addition, he said two of the companies on the list are legitimate organizations, but their names are being used without permission. Neither the Canadian Education Exchange Foundation (CEEF), nor the SEVECC Community Involvement Program are currently hiring for the positions described in the suspect offers.

Moorhouse said another big red flag is that new employees are asked to open a new bank account.

Risky business

In other scams he’s encountered, Moorhouse said bank accounts are used to deposit cheques that end up bouncing, leaving the employee on the hook after a portion of the money is withdrawn and wired to the scammer.

While people who have complained to the Better Business Bureau have not been taken for any money, Moorhouse says the company has released the results of its investigation to inform vulnerable job seekers.

“Even though we don’t really know what the company is trying to accomplish … we do sense that there is something going on here that’s a little bit bigger and they’re getting set up for something perhaps a little bit more risky,” he said.

Moorhouse said once people started asking questions to their contact at the company, communication stopped.

So far, he said the worst-case scenario for people who have complained to the Better Business Bureau is non-payment for work completed.

 

Source: cbc.ca

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